JOURNAL
Mirza Idrizović
1998
JOURNAL / Mirza Idrizović
Mirza Idrizović once said that “to make a film means to finish dreams started long ago”. That is how his films were. They would always leavesomething behind, because they were a life story, and not a construct of his. When you read this book then you see that Mirza perceived the world intensely, dynamically, in wonder and curious over the wonderful gardens of obsessions,...

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JOURNAL / Mirza Idrizović

 

Mirza Idrizović once said that “to make a film means to finish dreams started long ago”. That is how his films were. They would always leavesomething behind, because they were a life story, and not a construct of his. When you read this book then you see that Mirza perceived the world intensely, dynamically, in wonder and curious over the wonderful gardens of obsessions and deliriums of life. For him the world also means magic and change, and man must correspond with these possibilities in spirit. That is why in these essays, oftentimes joyfully, sometimes painfully, a possibility to feel and to be conscious – of beauty – is revealed.

It was as if the gift of storytelling of Idrizović obeyed the canons of film – dynamic transformations of his own impressions of life, which has its own imminentrhythm of time, but also an architecturalrhythm of space – which allow some places from his memories to stand out, like inside a frame, while others – mostly those bad and ugly – are pushed into the background. Mirza gave advantage to beauty in art and in life, even if its contents would change along with all the tensions and convulsions that follow up with each filmmaker from this area.

As his young student and colleague I had an opportunity to talk with him a lot. I will always remember those sincere encounters in which he had an unusual power to calmly, with lots of love find the exact right word that understands all the ambitions and dilemmas of a young man, just like a “friendly film spirit” as he was referred to by another colleague of his.

Maybe this is why we all loved Mirza’s films and his stories, like dreams, which provided colors to our feelings and forebodings, our personal and spiritual film metrics that revealed to us the secrets of life.

Standing behind those films is an author who grasped life through a prism of light and his transportations into imagery, atmosphere, words, and people – all that is never written in a script. His films weretied in that sort of harmony that is life itself – chosen by his own measure. That is why his appeal is not surprising, because that is a special poetic world coming from a sworn cineaste, from a curious and restless spirit set out on film as if it were a game.

As opposed to many of his colleagues, he was aware that there was no recipe for making a film.

In one film he expressed himself through a watercolor technique, an airy lightness and an appealing incompleteness (“A Frame for My Loved One’s Picture”), while in another he decided for a strict narration and universal isolated ambiences and protagonists whose drama is the focus of life in their quintessential sense (“Smell of Quinces” and “Azra”).

This is how Idrizović, withnotes of all the trends of his time, has profiledhimself as a director who expresses a concept similar to poetic realism, but filtered through an author’s optics which determines the film language of a sentient being with a rich scale of meaning.

When people who have truly done something in their life leave, it is not easy to talk, because their mark does not allow for empty ritual sayings. However, let us mention that the legacy of Mirza Idrizović is great and mandatory for our Bosnian-Herzegovinian film. His filmography makes the parameters of modernity of BH film, author’s consistency in exploring the form in which “creation is dearer than perfection.”

Dino Mustafić

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JOURNAL / Mirza Idrizović

 

Mirza Idrizović once said that “to make a film means to finish dreams started long ago”. That is how his films were. They would always leavesomething behind, because they were a life story, and not a construct of his. When you read this book then you see that Mirza perceived the world intensely, dynamically, in wonder and curious over the wonderful gardens of obsessions and deliriums of life. For him the world also means magic and change, and man must correspond with these possibilities in spirit. That is why in these essays, oftentimes joyfully, sometimes painfully, a possibility to feel and to be conscious – of beauty – is revealed.

It was as if the gift of storytelling of Idrizović obeyed the canons of film – dynamic transformations of his own impressions of life, which has its own imminentrhythm of time, but also an architecturalrhythm of space – which allow some places from his memories to stand out, like inside a frame, while others – mostly those bad and ugly – are pushed into the background. Mirza gave advantage to beauty in art and in life, even if its contents would change along with all the tensions and convulsions that follow up with each filmmaker from this area.

As his young student and colleague I had an opportunity to talk with him a lot. I will always remember those sincere encounters in which he had an unusual power to calmly, with lots of love find the exact right word that understands all the ambitions and dilemmas of a young man, just like a “friendly film spirit” as he was referred to by another colleague of his.

Maybe this is why we all loved Mirza’s films and his stories, like dreams, which provided colors to our feelings and forebodings, our personal and spiritual film metrics that revealed to us the secrets of life.

Standing behind those films is an author who grasped life through a prism of light and his transportations into imagery, atmosphere, words, and people – all that is never written in a script. His films weretied in that sort of harmony that is life itself – chosen by his own measure. That is why his appeal is not surprising, because that is a special poetic world coming from a sworn cineaste, from a curious and restless spirit set out on film as if it were a game.

As opposed to many of his colleagues, he was aware that there was no recipe for making a film.

In one film he expressed himself through a watercolor technique, an airy lightness and an appealing incompleteness (“A Frame for My Loved One’s Picture”), while in another he decided for a strict narration and universal isolated ambiences and protagonists whose drama is the focus of life in their quintessential sense (“Smell of Quinces” and “Azra”).

This is how Idrizović, withnotes of all the trends of his time, has profiledhimself as a director who expresses a concept similar to poetic realism, but filtered through an author’s optics which determines the film language of a sentient being with a rich scale of meaning.

When people who have truly done something in their life leave, it is not easy to talk, because their mark does not allow for empty ritual sayings. However, let us mention that the legacy of Mirza Idrizović is great and mandatory for our Bosnian-Herzegovinian film. His filmography makes the parameters of modernity of BH film, author’s consistency in exploring the form in which “creation is dearer than perfection.”

Dino Mustafić

Close