LOVE THY NEIGHBOR: A Story of War
Peter Maas
1998
LOVE THY NEIGHBOR: A Story of War / By Peter Maas
This book describes people and events happening in the war in Bosnia, but not from the angle of history or prediction of its final outcome. In matters of war and peace, it is best to resist the urge to speculate. The final events and the sudden twists are of secondary significance in this book, and in any case they only follow on with the course set-up in 1992 and 1993, when I had reported,...

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LOVE THY NEIGHBOR: A Story of War / Mirza Idrizović

 

This book describes people and events happening in the war in Bosnia, but not from the angle of history or prediction of its final outcome. In matters of war and peace, it is best to resist the urge to speculate. The final events and the sudden twists are of secondary significance in this book, and in any case they only follow on with the course set-up in 1992 and 1993, when I had reported about the war in Bosnia. Because, tragedy and human suffering theater described in the following pages have not changed ever since: those dead are not up from their graves; doubt hasn’t transformed into trust. Moreover, that which has happened to these people, happened to peoples in other countries, and is sure to happen again. War and its company – cowardice and heroism – are the universal characteristics of war. In this book I have attempted to research, I aimed at finding the answer to that horrible, maddening question “Why?”. That, more so than Bosnia,is the true theme of my story about war.

Peter Maass

“Brilliantly written with contained emotion, Peter Maass’s shattering book on the tragedy in the former Yugoslavia is more than a reportage; it is a powerful plea for sanity, decency and compassion on behalf of forgotten victims.”

Elie Wiesel

“This agonizing and difficult book is a form of therapy in the sense that only the truth can be healing. And in our case the truth is almost the same as Justice: after the international community determined the guilt, the only thing remaining is satisfaction in media.”

Ozren Kebo

“Like Michael Herr’s ‘Dispatches,’ this is a literary work about war that enlightens us, horrifies us and often forces us to face parts of ourselves that are unflatteringly familiar. A remarkable, brilliant book.”

Gay Telese

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LOVE THY NEIGHBOR: A Story of War / Mirza Idrizović

 

This book describes people and events happening in the war in Bosnia, but not from the angle of history or prediction of its final outcome. In matters of war and peace, it is best to resist the urge to speculate. The final events and the sudden twists are of secondary significance in this book, and in any case they only follow on with the course set-up in 1992 and 1993, when I had reported about the war in Bosnia. Because, tragedy and human suffering theater described in the following pages have not changed ever since: those dead are not up from their graves; doubt hasn’t transformed into trust. Moreover, that which has happened to these people, happened to peoples in other countries, and is sure to happen again. War and its company – cowardice and heroism – are the universal characteristics of war. In this book I have attempted to research, I aimed at finding the answer to that horrible, maddening question “Why?”. That, more so than Bosnia,is the true theme of my story about war.

Peter Maass

“Brilliantly written with contained emotion, Peter Maass’s shattering book on the tragedy in the former Yugoslavia is more than a reportage; it is a powerful plea for sanity, decency and compassion on behalf of forgotten victims.”

Elie Wiesel

“This agonizing and difficult book is a form of therapy in the sense that only the truth can be healing. And in our case the truth is almost the same as Justice: after the international community determined the guilt, the only thing remaining is satisfaction in media.”

Ozren Kebo

“Like Michael Herr’s ‘Dispatches,’ this is a literary work about war that enlightens us, horrifies us and often forces us to face parts of ourselves that are unflatteringly familiar. A remarkable, brilliant book.”

Gay Telese

Close